Nonlinear behaviour in the translational vestibuloocular reflex.

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The translational vestibuloocular reflex (TVOR) produces an eye movement response to linear head acceleration detected by the otolith organs in the inner ear. This study examines the linearity of the TVOR by comparing the response to a transient sum-of-sinusoids stimulus with the responses to each sinusoid component of the sum. A head-fixed rhesus monkey was translated in the dark along its interaural and nasooccipital axes with sinusoidal and transient motion. Eye movements were recorded using the magnetic search coil technique (Robinson 1963). The results of this study show that the TVOR displays linear characteristics during interaural translation for 0.5--7 Hz stimuli. The eye response to sinusoidal stimuli is consistent across the stimulus frequency range. However, the eye response to transient stimuli starts to exhibit a frequency-dependent trend at the higher frequencies thus suggesting that nonlinearities in the TVOR may exist for frequencies above the range used in these experiments.

The Physical Object
Pagination95 leaves.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL19215324M
ISBN 100494022884

Description Nonlinear behaviour in the translational vestibuloocular reflex. PDF

Eccentric sinusoidal rotation with the nose facing out or in leads to gain modulation of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR), which is a result of an interaction between angular and translational VOR. Abstract. During head motion, the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) and the pursuit system interact in the control of eye movements.

Head rotation induces opposite-directed eye movements via VOR which stabilize the : O. Bock. Eccentric sinusoidal rotation with the nose facing out or in leads to gain modulation of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR), which is a result of an interaction between angular and translational VOR.

There are conflicting reports with regard to the type of by: The vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) is a type of involuntary eye movement that stabilizes retinal images during head perturbations to maintain clear by: 3.

A hybrid nonlinear bilateral model for the horizontal angular vestibulo-ocular reflex (AVOR) is presented in this paper. The model relies on known interconnections between saccadic burst circuits. The translational vestibuloocular reflex (tVOR) stabilizes gaze in response to translational movements.

This is a compli-cated task because the peripheral otolith organs respond iden-tically to tilt and to linear translation, whereas the ocular response to Cited by: A MODEL FOR THE TRANSLATIONAL VEsTIBUL0-OCULAR REFLEX W~sam Musallam Master of Science Department of Physiology University of Toronto The vestibular system is the system of vestibulo-odar reflex (VOR) moves the eyes in response to head movements by uMg iaformaàon from the angular motion detectors, the semi-circular can& (AVOR), and linear motion.

The vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) produces compensatory eye rotations in response to accelerations of the head.

Linear head accelerations, including gravity, are sensed by the otolith organs (the saccule and the utricle) and their stimulation produces compensatory responses to stabilize the position of the body and the : Stefano Ramat, Benjamin T.

Crane.

Details Nonlinear behaviour in the translational vestibuloocular reflex. FB2

The vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) is an important model system for the study of motor learning. VOR behavior can be modified through experience in various ways. This paper describes a new model of VOR habituation, in which a sinusoidal stimulus is habituated not as a continuous signal but as a set of separate fragments or by: 7.

As such nonlinear phase coupling between the perturbation and muscle activity is dominated by the spinal reflex loop. This study provides new evidence of nonlinear neuronal synchronization in the stretch reflex at the wrist joint with respect to spinal and transcortical by: The Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex: Kinematic Model.

Figure: Diagram showing the definition of the vectors used in the equation of the kinematic model of the vestibulo-ocular reflex. The ideal VOR response is a compensatory eye movement which keeps the image fixed on the retina for any head rotations and translations.

Abstract: The goal of this study was to assess the effect of amplitude and frequency predictability on the performance of the translational vestibulo-ocular reflex (tVOR). Eye movements were recorded in 5 subjects during continuous vertical translation that consisted of a series of segments with: 1) 3 amplitudes at constant frequency (2 Hz) or.

The otolith-driven translational vestibulo-ocular reflex (tVOR) generates compensatory eye movements to linear head accelerations. Studies in humans indicate that the cerebellum plays a critical role in the neural control of the tVOR, but little is known about mechanisms of this control or the functions of specific cerebellar by: The vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) is an involuntary eye movement evoked by head movements.

It is also influenced by viewing distance. This paper presents a hybrid nonlinear bilateral model for the horizontal angular vestibulo-ocular reflex (AVOR) in the dark. The model is based on known interconnections between saccadic burst circuits in.

The vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) is an involuntary eye movement evoked by head movements.

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It is also influenced by viewing distance. This paper presents a hybrid nonlinear bilateral model for the horizontal angular vestibulo-ocular reflex (AVOR) in the dark. The model is based on known interconnections between saccadic burst circuits in the brainstem and ocular premotor areas in the Cited by: 5.

Behavior of the human translational vestibulo-ocular reflex during simultaneous head translation and rotation Issue title: The Vestibular System: A Clinical and Scientific Update in Siena In honor of Professor Daniele Nuti, Siena, Italy, April 5–6, Author: Rosalyn Schneider, Ke Liao, Mark F.

Walker, Adolfo Bronstein, R. John Leigh. This chapter reviews properties and neural substrate of vestibular and optokinetic eye movements. Geometric aspects of head rotations and translations (linear movements) are related to properties of rotational and translational vestibulo-ocular reflexes.

The motion sensors of the vestibular labyrinth -the semicircular canals and otolith organs - are described. Vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR). A reflex that moves the eye in the opposite direction of the ongoing head motion to stabilize the visual axis of gaze relative to the by: Previous work in squirrel monkeys has demonstrated the presence of linear and nonlinear components to the horizontal vestibuloocular reflex (VOR) evoked by high-acceleration rotations.

The nonlinear component is seen as a rise in gain with increasing velocity of rotation at frequencies more than 2 Hz (a velocity-dependent gain enhancement).Cited by:   It is well established that the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) depends not only on sensory stimulation but also on the behavioral context associated with the stimulation.

Recent modeling studies suggested that including a non-linearity in the activation function of the VOR neurons achieves the desired context-dependence for the VOR without resorting to currently assumed complex cortical.

Davis, P. & Melvill Jones, G. () An adaptive neural model compatible with plastic changes induced in the human vestibulo-ocular reflex by prolonged optical reversal of vision. Brain Research –Cited by: ,“Model analysis of influence of mental workload on vestibulo-ocular reflex”, IFAC-HMS, Estonia,“Auditory Assist Method for Steering Start Timing in Reverse Parking”, International Symposium on Future Active Safety Technology toward Zero Traffic Accidents (FAST-zero’19),   Purchase Mathematical Modelling in Motor Neuroscience: State of the Art and Translation to the Clinic.

Ocular Motor Plant and Gaze Stabilization Mechanisms, Volume - 1st Edition. Print Book & E-Book. ISBNINTRODUCTION. Translational vestibuloocular reflexes (trVORs) are elicited in response to translational head displacements.

Even though trVOR responses are either absent or rudimental in lateral-eyed species (Baarsma and Collewijn ; Dickman and Angelaki ; Hess and Dieringer ), they constitute a robust pattern of highly specific and geometrically complex eye movement. The inputs to the reflex come from linear and nonlinear pathways.

The linear pathway is responsible for the constant gain across frequencies at peak head velocity of 20°/s and also for the phase lag at higher frequencies being less than that expected based on the reflex delay. The latency of the cat vestibulo-ocular reflex before and after.

Note how translational vestibulo‐ocular reflex (tVOR) (vertical eye rotation) increased during near viewing (17 cm) compared with far viewing (2 m) for the normal subject, but remained less than the eye movement required to keep the fovea (line of sight) pointed at the visual target (dotted lines).

The PSP patient showed inability to converge Cited by: 3. A portable eye reflex measuring device for use in an ambulatory occupational environment is disclosed. The eye reflex measuring device compares data from an eye movement detector with data from a head movement detector at a frequency or frequencies in the range of Hertz to 15 Hertz to determine eye response to head movement.

The gain and phase of the eye response is calculated using a Cited by: A Recurrent Neural Network Model of Velocity Storage in the Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex Thomas J. Anastasio Department of Otolaryngology University of Southern California School of Medicine Los Angeles, CA Abstract A three-layered neural network model was used to explore the organization of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR).

Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex Model (VOR), Optokinetic Reflex (VOR), Mental Workload, Drive Distraction 1. Introduction The Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex Model and Its Application The vestibular system, which is a sensory mechanism in the inner ear, provides the principal contribution to the sense of balance and spatial orientation.

TheFile Size: 3MB. The vestibular-ocular reflex (VOR) is a plastic system found in vertebrates which produces eye rotations that compensate for head rotations. Simultaneous motion and vision are thus possible since the reflex keeps vision from becoming bluffed during : Ernst Russell Dow.

Also sometimes called caloric reflex, because a stimulation is based on pouring of cold or warm water into the is better to put patient´s head a slight reclining, because we want to influent especially lateral semicircular tubule of an inner ear.A small amount of water flow induces movement of endolymph.

Test can be sometimes false-positive if there is any other diasease of inner ear.The vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) is a reflex eye movement that stabilizes images on the retina during head movement by producing an eye movement in the direction opposite to head movement, thus preserving the image on the center of the visual field.

For example, when the head moves to the right, the eyes move to the left, and vice versa. Since slight head movement is present all the time, the. Purchase Identification and System Parameter Estimation - 1st Edition. Print Book & E-Book. ISBNBook Edition: 1.